Monday, March 18, 2013

Morning Prayer Guide - Monday

Monday, March 18, 2013 – St. Patrick of Ireland (Transferred)
Begin by praying the Collect for Grace and Collect for Purity.

Collect for Grace:
Lord God, almighty and everlasting Father, you have brought us safely to this new day: Preserve us with your mighty power, that we may not fall into sin, nor be overcome by adversity; and in all we do, direct us to the fulfilling of your purpose; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Collect for Purity:
Almighty God, to you all hearts are open, all desires known, and from you no secrets are hidden: Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of your Holy Spirit, that we might perfectly love you, and worthily magnify your holy name; through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Read: Deuteronomy 32:1-9, Psalm 145:1-13, 2 Corinthians 4:1-12, and John 4:31-38

St. Patrick is perhaps the perfect example of Lenten discipline.  He was born near Dumbarton, in Scotland, in the year 387. When he was about sixteen, Patrick was taken captive by Irish marauders and sold as a slave to a chieftain. For six years he was a shepherd in the valley of the Braid and on the slopes of Slemish.

Patrick’s captivity became a preparation for his future apostolate. He acquired a perfect knowledge of the Celtic tongue in which he would one day announce the glad tidings of Redemption. His master, Milchu, was a Druid high priest, and this allowed Patrick to become familiar with all of the details of Druidism.

After six years, on the advice of an angel, Patrick fled from his master. He traveled until he found a ship ready to set sail. In a few days he was in Britain, but now his heart was set on devoting himself to the service of God in the sacred ministry. He went to France where he joined Saint Germain, bishop of Auxerre, and put himself under the bishop’s guidance and was ordained to the priesthood.

His arrival in Ireland (ca. 433) was greeted with opposition from Druid chieftans. He returned to Dalaradia where he had been a slave to pay the price of ransom to his former master, and to bring him to Christ but as he approached he saw the castle burning in the distance. The word of Patrick’s coming had preceded him, and the frenzied Milchu gathered his treasures into his mansion, set it on fire, and cast himself into the flames. An ancient record adds: “His pride could not endure the thought of being vanquished by his former slave.”

The druids and magicians fought to maintain their control over the Irish, but Patrick's prayer and faith triumphed. On Easter Day 433, after winning the Irish Chieftains over to Christianity, Saint Patrick is said to have plucked a shamrock to explain by its triple leaf and single stem the Blessed Trinity. This trefoil, called “Patrick's Cross,” became the symbol both of the saint and of Ireland itself.

Patrick endured hardship, which strengthened him for greater things.  He could have become bitter and died a slave, or escaped and never returned.  But God wanted more from Patrick.  Take some time to think about how Patrick’s example applies to you.  Are the hardships you have faced a training ground for God’s calling on your life?  Ask God to help you with this.  You may find the following prayer helpful:
Father in heaven, you sent the great bishop Patrick to the people of Ireland to share his faith and to spend his life in loving service: Grant us grace that our lives might bear witness to the faith we profess, and our love bring others to the peace and joy of your Gospel, through Christ our Lord.  Amen.

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